Work health and safety for Easter

 

Blame our doggy genetics

OK, I admit most dogs are scavengers and are hard-wired to gobble down food as hard and fast as they can. In my role as Fur Experience Consultant, work health and safety is part of my remit so I’ve laid down the law about how to keep dogs safe from their voracious appetites over the Easter break.

Chocolate might be good, but it’s baaaad for me

How cute is IKEA’s flat-packed Easter bunny? Don’t give it to me though. Chocolate of any kind has theobromine and methylxanthines which can cause vomiting and diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures and even death. Not nice, right?

The darker chocolate is, the more dangerous it is to dogs.. This Mosman vet has a handy chocolate toxicity calculator to work out just how much you should panic based on the type of chocolate your dog has eaten. It’s my job to make sure no furry friends break in to the yard during this year’s Easter egg hunt.

The VARKANSLA flat-pack Easter Bunny from IKEA doesn’t need an Allen key for assembly.

The VARKANSLA flat-pack Easter Bunny from IKEA doesn’t need an Allen key for assembly.

Raisins and grapes - nu-uh

We had a nasty incident after Molly and I accidentally ate a few grapes. They looked so refreshing and tasty, that we couldn’t resist gobbling them up. But that was a big mistake. Grapes and raisins give dogs kidney failure. So don’t break off bits of hot cross bun and slip it to the dog. Don’t let fresh grapes roll on to the floor or slip deliciously from your hand into a dog’s mouth. 

Macadamia and other nuts

The humans might love these nuts, but they just aren’t any good for dogs. Macadamia nuts can cause weakness, depression, tremors, vomiting and increased body temperature. Even almonds, pecans, and walnuts  contain high amounts of oils and fats which can cause vomiting and diarrhea, and potentially cause pancreatitis. Don’t give us nuts. Give us pig ears.

Xylitol - a sugar substitute in chewing gum and peanut butter

I know chewing gum doesn’t look appetising, but sometimes dogs just sniff something out and think it will be tasty. Especially if we find it in a handbag or tucked in the pocket of some jeans left lying on the floor. Xylitol is fine for humans, and rats. It’s terrible for dogs and cats, giving us low blood sugar, making us tremble and possibly end up having seizures.

Please have a great time over Easter, but also keep yourselves - and your dogs - safe over the holidays. Enjoy your break and come back as refreshed and zen as me. You deserve it ....



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Rocket the Golden Retriever is the fur experience consultant at The Possibility Partnership.

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